Archive | Tutorials

Install OpenCV 4 on macOS

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions to install OpenCV 4 (with Python bindings) on your macOS machine. While OpenCV 4 has not been officially released yet, a release is expected in autumn 2018. In the meantime, you can compile and install OpenCV 4 from source on your macOS system using the pre-release on GitHub. Once OpenCV 4 […]

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How to install OpenCV 4 on Ubuntu

In this tutorial you will learn how to install OpenCV 4 on your Ubuntu system. OpenCV 4 has not been officially released yet; however, a release is expected in autumn 2018. In the meantime, we can compile and install OpenCV 4 from source using the pre-release on GitHub. Once OpenCV 4 is officially released I […]

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OpenCV People Counter

In this tutorial you will learn how to build a “people counter” with OpenCV and Python. Using OpenCV, we’ll count the number of people who are heading “in” or “out” of a department store in real-time. Building a person counter with OpenCV has been one of the most-requested topics here on the PyImageSearch and I’ve […]

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OpenCV Object Tracking

In last week’s blog post we got our feet wet by implementing a simple object tracking algorithm called “centroid tracking”. Today, we are going to take the next step and look at eight separate object tracking algorithms built right into OpenCV! You see, while our centroid tracker worked well, it required us to run an […]

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OpenCV Tutorial: A Guide to Learn OpenCV

Whether you’re interested in learning how to apply facial recognition to video streams, building a complete deep learning pipeline for image classification, or simply want to tinker with your Raspberry Pi and add image recognition to a hobby project, you’ll need to learn OpenCV somewhere along the way. The truth is that learning OpenCV used […]

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OpenCV Saliency Detection

Today’s tutorial is on saliency detection, the process of applying image processing and computer vision algorithms to automatically locate the most “salient” regions of an image. In essence, saliency is what “stands out” in a photo or scene, enabling your eye-brain connection to quickly (and essentially unconsciously) focus on the most important regions. For example — […]

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